Traditions

November 30; Feast of St. Andrew. The night before the cellars are opened and the Island moves into a big party. St. Andrew was the brother of St. Peter, apostle and fisherman, but was not aware of any link with the wine or the vine. Perhaps it is the party coincides with the development of a miracle that occurs inside the wineries and has nothing to do with the scriptures.

It’s the biggest night of the wine, it is the magical night. It has always been like this. On the night of San Andrés wineries open, the cars run, according to popular tradition, and tested the new wine. Gone is the daily effort, sweat and art work of each. Grilled sardines, roasted chestnuts, meat and bread anise party, are the constant companions of this great night.

On the eve of San Andrés tables are run in Icod and La Guancha, a tradition that some chroniclers apparently goes back to using the old “Corsican” or tables carrying pipes in the wine century XVI. Young glide over tea tables, individual or collective, previously greased with tallow, the steepest streets in the city. For maneuvering, avoiding the paved shoulders, corners and walls and control the speed and braking, wooden oars had the driver of the table were originally used. Currently, braking is done via the collision with tires.

Tonight, the pots are dragged in Puerto de la Cruz and other towns in the Valle de La Orotava, a tradition that recalls the sound of drums and barrels to roll on the stone streets on their way to the port. Empty cans, old metal artifacts, objects of all kinds are also crawl that night through the streets and squares. And are the big and young, and even the elderly and children, that Eve are believed to have invented the noise.

All in honor of San Andrés and new wine that springs that night in the cellars.

Adapted from “Se abren las bodegas”. Alemán de Armas, G