The importance of Tenerife wines

In 1573, the Courts of Madrid Philip II presents a report on the abandonment of sugar cane and the flourishing state of the wine trade in the Canaries. At this time an extraordinary demand canary wine trade which becomes the main source of income of the archipelago over three centuries originates.

Sailors, pirates and privateers, some of which attack island ports with the sole purpose of getting their wines are hawking the world the excellence of their Malvasías.

It should be noted this time the famous wines of return, traveling first to America and then returned once agitated by the oceans, which improved and aged faster, being sold in European markets where they were prized.

As a mark of glorious past and a reflection of the wealth during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the wine trade with America and Europe provided the Island of Tenerife, have reached our furnishings days of luxury and civil and religious buildings built in those years and countless quotations from relevant literary authors of the time who sang praises of Canarian Malvasia.

The Malvasia de Tenerife was considered one of the best, if not the best in the world, proves that the official poet of the English Court, William Shakespeare, receives annually as part of their salary, a barrel of wine that Tenerife. Shakespeare repeatedly dumped in their praise of our Malvasia and becomes not only its undisputed champion but mostly propaganda. Her characters in “King Henry IV”, “Twelfth Night or whatever you want” or “The Merry Wives of Windsor” taste the “… Canaries, wine and wonderfully pungent perfumes the blood.”

And something must have this wine exalted literary inspiration and muses satisfied when testify also their preferences through their works many other authors like Walter Scott, Alksandr I. Kuprin, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Keats, Carlo Goldoni, Luis de Gongora, Maine Red and Joshep Spillman.

Alexander Von Humbolt, the famous German naturalist, was also impressed by the majesty of Tenerife vineyard in his brief stay on the island in 1799, being reflected in his book “Journey to the Canary Islands”, “… down to the Valley of Tacoronte into that delicious country who have spoken enthusiastically travelers all nations. From Tegueste and Tacoronte to the village of San Juan de la Rambla, which is famous for its excellent wine Malvasia, the coast is cultivated like a garden. The hills are cultivated with vineyards they tend their vines on very high varasetos “.

But not the whole historical presence of our wines. On July 25, 1797, the British fleet commanded by Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, had tried to sack the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, after a fierce battle epic, withdraws its bid, surrendering the forces that had landed in the small town. He signed peace among men of British and Spanish honor, an exchange of presents between Admiral Nelson and General Gutierrez supporter of the square (cheese and beer by Admiral Nelson and Malvasia de Tenerife by the General Gutiérrez) occurs.